7 Positive Contributions of Football – The New Season Begins…


 

Players of Arsenal F.C. and Everton F.C. shaki...

Image via Wikipedia

Last weekend saw the start of the new football season. Fans across the country put the sad and unfortunate events of earlier in the week (UK Riots) aside to rally together yet again in support of their favorite teams nationwide.  Personally I don’t follow any teams, I know very little about football in general, but what I do know is that it is one of the subjects that unites communities, regardless of their other differences. Of course football has it’s dark side too, hooliganism, racism and fights etc, but this is a positive post focusing on the joys of camaraderie and the way watching 22 men run around a pitch with a ball makes thousands of people happy. For 90 minutes men, women and children join together to share an experience that can make them laugh and cheer with joy if their team is winning and scream, complain and weep if their team is defeated.

The season was due to kick off with 7 premiership matches on Saturday 13.08.2011, but due to the riots earlier in the week the match between Tottenham and Everton was postponed, so only 6 were played.

Blackburn v Wolverhampton   FT score = 1-2

Fulham v Aston Villa   FT score = 0-0

Liverpool v Sunderland   FT Score = 1-1

QPR v Bolton   FT Score = 0-4

Wigan v Norwich   FT Score = 1 -1

Newcastle v Arsenal FT Score = 0-0

In addition to these there were also matches in the Championship, League 1 & 2, and Conference leagues, but this would be a very long post if I listed all of the results!

I did wonder when this topic was suggested if I could pull off writing about football seeing as I know so little about it.  Should I explain some of the basics, such as I have stated that ’22 men run around a pitch with a ball’ does this need explaining for those who know even less than me? or that a match lasts 90 minutes? or is that going a bit too far? Instead I am going to focus on the positive contributions football makes to our society –

  1. Good-parent child relationships – Football can bring families together, support for a team may be handed down the generations and where families share an interest in football it can help build lasting bonds between parents and children.
  2. Bringing people together with a common interest – be it at the match or in the pub, people who may not otherwise have reason to get together or communicate can put aside their differences and cheer on their team together, debating the ‘offside rule‘, and the pro’s and con’s of the latest player sign-ups.
  3. Raising morale in a community – When a team does particularly well, such as winning a championship cup the whole community will come out in force to welcome home the ‘champions’, again differences are put aside for a shared positive experience.
  4. Influence the economy – We may all rant about footballers being paid too much, and fans complain about the cost of tickets but like it or not football does bring money into the country as well, their are fans of our premiership teams all over the world who come here to support our teams, and while they are here they spend money…
  5. Charitable contributions – Footballers are always hitting the headlines for all the negative things they do, but when they do good this is bypassed by the media. You can more read about footballers charitable contributions here.
  6. Education – I remember teachers using football to help explain maths concepts to us when I was younger, hopefully this is still done as it was a really good way to utilise a subject that kids enjoy and understand to help them get a grasp of something else less interesting, fair enough it probably worked better for the boys who knew more about football scoring to begin with, lol
  7. Health benefits – well, okay this may only apply to those that ‘play’ football rather than spectate, but still. Partaking in a sporting activity is good for you and for lots of young people if it wasn’t for football they may not otherwise join in much if any physical activity…

I bet you can think of some more positive contributions Football makes to society? Why not let me know your thoughts by leaving a comment 🙂

Thank you for reading!  If you have enjoyed reading this post please share it with others who may be interested and I always enjoy receiving feedback and comments 🙂

 

Advertisements

6 comments on “7 Positive Contributions of Football – The New Season Begins…

  1. I am an avid supporter – Aston Villa in my case. I may now live 70 miles away from the ground, but I and my eldest lad (30) are Season Ticket holders and we have never felt closer to the club than we do today. We travel to Birmingham for every home game, whether that be day or night, sun or snow. It has had a postive effect our relationship too.

    You are right about it being more than ‘just a game’ irrespective of what those who are not interested in the game may say. It is almost like a 2nd family. There is no point in trying to explain that to some, but ever more so the fans have come to realise in these days of foreign owners and players that it is the fans themselves that ARE the club. The owners and players are transient … but they can never take the colours, the badge, the ground, the songs, the humour or the heart and soul of the club with them when they leave. They all live on within the community.

    My Dad who is a West Brom supporter (don’t ask!) used to say “You Villa fans are crazy – 20,000 of you would turn up just to watch the shirts drying on the washing line”. In a way he is right, and that would more or less apply to supporters of most clubs, because it is the colours and the badge that are the most precious part of the equation as they represent all the shared joys, hopes and pain over the years.

    As an aside, and in relation to last weeks events – it has gone unreported, but there were a number of instances where supporters of several clubs from the same vicinity joined together to take on some of those rioters and repel them. Like that or not, and some may take an uncharitable view of why they would do that, but just like many of you they also take pride in their area, and strangely enough when they are away from the ground they are usually just like everyone else – just normal people. But in this case they were people who already had a community spirit and used it to the benefit of the community, just as much as the broom carriers of Clapham did.

    I am fairly confident that after the events of last week it would have been the week-ends football games that could have easily taken place almost without any Policing at most of the grounds.

    There are of course many things within the game that need to be addressed, and just like many who would only wish to criticise, then one of the the biggest evils are the salaries. BUT who would you prefer all the money that is generated to go to? The players who bring in the crowds, or the foreign owners?

    To see some of the good that my club does just go to http://www.acorns.org.uk/astonvilla . The best selling shirt the Villa have had over the past few years was the first season when the Acorns logo was being carried. That made us all feel fairly proud and the Villa website was full of comments form others clubs supporters expressing their admiration for the move. It’s still the only shirt I will wear on match days.

    And if you’re hungry to find out more then how about http://www.visitbirmingham.com/eating_out/villa_midlands_food__training_restaurant/

    ;-p

    • Thanks for sharing Rob. When I was writing this my fiancee (not a football fan) was saying all the ‘bad’ things about football and how could I write about the ‘positives’ because as he sees it there are none, but I knew that even though I’m not a fan myself there are good things about football – although I had hoped to list 10 but could only think of 7; even with asking my friends who are fans, they struggled to come up with as many as me!

      I also heard about the footy fans how were defending against rioters – the Zulu Army (B’Ham City Fans) were out in force to see off any rioters in Birmingham.

  2. It wasn’t just the Brum fans … there were a few from each of local clubs. I also understand that Chelsea and Milwall fans combined to oppose what was happening too.

    And as always we need to remember that ‘good news does not a good story make’ … hence why those who don’t support any particular team hardly ever hear about the good news, although this one surfaced recently http://www.mirrorfootball.co.uk/news/Manchester-City-news-Gareth-Barry-hands-keys-to-his-Spanish-holiday-home-to-charity-caring-sick-and-poor-kids-article780115.html

    • Yeah, I only knew about the Blues fans cause a fan mentioned it, but I assumed others were doing the same.

      I like the story about Gareth Barry, another example of positive contributions – like you say its just a shame that the good news rarely surfaces in the media :/

Comments are closed.