Counting Sheep – 31 Great Quotes for National Sleep Awareness Week


sleep

sleep (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

The 5th-11th March is National Sleep Awareness Week.

Raising awareness about sleep issues from snoring to insomnia, sleep disruption and how to get enough sleep. You can find out more at the National Sleep Foundation Website.

Do you get enough sleep?

How much is enough?

Is it quantity or quality that matters?

With tips from avoiding caffeine and exercise in the three hours before you sleep to having a nice soak in the bath, to when to seek advice from your doctor to get help for sleep problems, this week is dedicated to helping us all get a better night’s sleep.

Personally my sleep patterns vary with my moods and emotions, suffering from BPD. Anything from fully functioning and productive on just 3-4 hours sleep per night in a high phase, to having 8-10 hours and still being weak, fatigued and dosing off during the day in low phases.

I thought it would be nice to share some sleep inspired quotes, which one is your favourite?

(All quotes courtesy of the Quote Garden)

  1. People who say they sleep like a baby usually don’t have one. ~Leo J. Burke
  2. Sleeping is no mean art:  for its sake one must stay awake all day.  ~Friedrich Nietzsche
  3. Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleave of care, The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast. ~William Shakespeare, Macbeth
  4. No day is so bad it can’t be fixed with a nap.  ~Carrie Snow
  5. If you can’t sleep, then get up and do something instead of lying there worrying.  It’s the worry that gets you, not the lack of sleep.  ~Dale Carnegie
  6. Life is something that happens when you can’t get to sleep.  ~Fran Lebowitz
  7. There is more refreshment and stimulation in a nap, even of the briefest, than in all the alcohol ever distilled.  ~Edward Lucas
  8. It’s a cruel season that makes you get ready for bed while it’s light out.  ~Bill Watterson
  9. The bed is a bundle of paradoxes:  we go to it with reluctance, yet we quit it with regret; we make up our minds every night to leave it early, but we make up our bodies every morning to keep it late.  ~Charles Caleb Colton
  10. A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor’s book.  ~Irish Proverb
  11. Life is too short to sleep on low thread-count sheets.  ~Leah Stussy
  12. Most people do not consider dawn to be an attractive experience – unless they are still up.  ~Ellen Goodman
  13. Sleep… Oh! how I loathe those little slices of death.  ~Author unknown, various wordings commonly attributed to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allan Poe, and Journey to the Center of the Earth
  14. Consciousness:  that annoying time between naps.  ~Author Unknown
  15. Insomnia is a gross feeder.  It will nourish itself on any kind of thinking, including thinking about not thinking.  ~Clifton Fadiman
  16. There is no snooze button on a cat who wants breakfast.  ~Author Unknown
  17. If people were meant to pop out of bed, we’d all sleep in toasters.  ~Author unknown, attributed to Jim Davis
  18. Sleep is a symptom of caffeine deprivation.  ~Author Unknown
  19. People who snore always fall asleep first.  ~Author Unknown
  20. There is no hope for a civilization which starts each day to the sound of an alarm clock.  ~Author Unknown
  21. All men whilst they are awake are in one common world:  but each of them, when he is asleep, is in a world of his own.  ~Plutarch
  22. I hate it when my foot falls asleep during the day, because that means it’s going to be up all night.  ~Steven Wright
  23. I’m not asleep… but that doesn’t mean I’m awake.  ~Author Unknown
  24. A little insomnia is not without its value in making us appreciate sleep, in throwing a ray of light upon that darkness.  ~Marcel Proust
  25. Not being able to sleep is terrible.  You have the misery of having partied all night… without the satisfaction.  ~Lynn Johnston
  26. The amount of sleep required by the average person is five minutes more.  ~Wilson Mizener
  27. Laugh and the world laughs with you, snore and you sleep alone.  ~Anthony Burgess
  28. Early to rise and early to bed
    Makes a man healthy and wealthy and dead.
    ~James Thurber, Fables for Our Times, 1940
  29. For sleep, one needs endless depths of blackness to sink into; daylight is too shallow, it will not cover one.  ~Anne Morrow Lindbergh
  30. The feeling of sleepiness when you are not in bed, and can’t get there, is the meanest feeling in the world.  ~Edgar Watson Howe

and my personal favourite…

31. Dawn:  When men of reason go to bed.  ~Ambrose Bierce

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9 comments on “Counting Sheep – 31 Great Quotes for National Sleep Awareness Week

  1. LOL – People who say they sleep like a baby usually don’t have one.

    That is so darn true!

    My sister has a 5 week old baby and is up every couple/few hours feeding her! Her baby certainly doesn’t doesn’t fit in to the stereotype of ‘sleeping like a baby/log’. Neither does her first child either!

    So, it’s true to say that that saying is correct!

    The Quiet Borderline
    http://quietbpd.wordpress.com/

  2. I suffer almost everyday with a severe sleep disorder, and the value of sleep is paramount to none. Getting a full and rested night sleep is virtually impossible for me, and ultimately in it’s coarse is a rare gift. I’ll probably, no, most likely never experience pleasant deep sleep like I did when I was young. So I, as many others do, understand the value of just one night of sleep. I always under estimated the precedence of sleep until I was sick with it. It affects your mental faculties, your appetite, even your sex drive. Sleep, or lack or it/lack of quality, can destroy everything around you. Believe me I know. You’re entire life can come unraveled around you when struggling with a sleep disorder, and you standing there without the faculties left to put it back together.

    To the outside world, the sleep disorder sufferer is “The hypochondriac” complaining of illnesses that can’t be seen and of troubling health problems that don’t seem to connect. To the sleeper who doesn’t truly sleep, it’s a living hell of fatigue, anguish, and strange illnesses knocking on your door, back to back to back. Your body is too weary to fight minor infections efficiently, and your mind is two foggy to fully perceive the world around you. It’s like living in a dream that continues while your awake, only it always teeters from dream to nightmare. Severe sleep disorders can consume everything in your life and deprive it of even simple joys. It can even make alcohol seem more like a stimulant. (Something I learned from one of the few nights friends managed to drag me out of bed to do something).

    What is so scary about sleep disorders lies in the speed at which they take you. It’s a slow creep, and ebbing flow, until one day you wake up unable to remember the last time you really “slept”. On your good days, you can have spurts of semi-awareness of the condition of your poor sleep, but the world demand automatons with little time to think of such things. It is true that I life lived but the clock is a life wasted, and surely and quick ticket to death. “Early to rise, early to bed… makes a man wealthy and healthy and death” – Thurber. Only problem is that our culture took away the wealth. Our culture as created an environment where things are so disparate that people who must work, work themselves to death. I hope that understanding the human value of sleep, and rest for our bodies which we tax for our goods will one day derive a world with better equality.

    “Sleep is my daily dose of insanity and the fuel that keeps my creativity going. Dreams are total insanity, a hallucinogenic trip through our memories both recent and distant” – that is my take on dreaming. Science says that sleep is necessary to human innovation, and I’d tend to agree. A little dose of insanity for the sane can’t hurt, as even the deadliest poison can be medicine in correct doses.

    • Hi Renata,

      Thanks for sharing your experiences of sleep disorder. It must be really difficult to cope with, I know how tough my own sleep issues can be, but they are nothing in comparison!

      • It is not as bad now (though it never goes away), but unfortunately the world doesn’t let us sleep when we are weary, and therefore the person who can’t control their sleep anymore is some what less valuable in the workforce. Treated a person with severe apnea can be relatively normal, untreated for long enough and you can collapse from fatigue. Been there, done that, got the t-shirt. If you wanted an insight as to the dangerous message our culture is sending look no farther than the commercial success of uppers and downers for shift workers, known as Provigil and Ambien. At one point in time you’d be fired for using uppers to work, and downers to sleep, but now the kind of effort that requires drugs to maintain for long periods is the expectation. I don’t know about Britain, but the FDA green-lights these drugs without a second thought for safety, or the longevity for the people the system abuses who need it.

        Something that if we are to bring awareness to sleep disorders that needs to be addressed is also how as culture we demand more, for less. Energy drinks, and other stimulants are just another part of the drive for efficiency and productivity driven to astronomical levels.

      • Drugs in the UK tend to get held back far longer than necessary even when proven safe, money always being the issue here due to the NHS being the main source of treatment for any condition, so patients have to go without things that could help them :/

      • That is not zesty. I think the problem i mentioned is more pronounced in the US, but that is no good that drugs take so long to get out, but some of those drugs being held back is actually a good thing. They keep us Americans pumped up on something all the time, which is bad. Big Pharmaceutical has more control over medicine than doctors do it seems. But I have seen similar problems in other socialized systems of medicine, but the problem isn’t socialized medicine but bureaucracy and funding. The create systems to help everyone then fail to maintain them, and falter in efficiency. This isn’t the case in all socialized medical systems, but it is the conservative party line in the US against such systems.

      • Yeah, I think it is a big problem worldwide! Either people can’t get access to drugs that would help due to silly bureaucracies or things that may be harmful slip into availability before the risks are well enough established – a no-win situation! :/

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